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NBOME
Twelve lucky winners will receive a FREE COMSAE! Please read the official rules for terms and conditions. Submission Period: December 1, 2020 – December 12, 2020 at 12:00am EST.

Twelve lucky winners will receive a FREE COMSAE!

How to Enter:

  1. Access our post here: INSTAGRAM | FACEBOOK
  2. Comment on the post and share some of your best tips and tricks to managing your wellness while preparing for COMLEX-USA.

Official Rules and Fine Print

  1. Submission Period: December 1, 2020 – December 12, 2020 at 12:00am EST.
  2. Submitted photos or text must be original. You hereby warrant and represent that (a) you own all rights to all Entry Materials submitted by you; and (b) all such Entry Materials are original works of authorship on your part and have not been copied, in whole or in part, from any other work and do not violate, misappropriate or infringe any copyright, trademark or other proprietary right of any other person or entity. You hereby verify that you will provide full written permission of any recognizable person, and their guardian if they are a minor, who are depicted in your Entry Materials.
  3. 12 winners will be randomly selected on December 14th and PM’d by NBOME for additional information through messenger. Please note you will need to accept the message request if you have not messaged with us before.
  4. Winners must respond within 24 hours to remain eligible, otherwise a replacement winner will be selected.
  5. Quotes from the comments may be utilized for future RTDOL social media posts by the NBOME. By responding to the giveaway, you also give us permission to use your suggestions in our campaign.
  6. The awarded COMSAE is non-transferable.
Forms

Name Change Form

Third Party Transcript Request Form

Rescheduling Fee Waiver

Instructions to Request Test Accommodations

Request Accommodation

Scoring & Reporting

After completing an exam, candidates will receive a Score Report and Performance Profile which provides a numerical standard score for the total test and a graphic presentation for performance on three groups of content areas.

Score Report

The COMSAE report consists of a three-digit numerical score for the total test and a graphic representation of performance by content area. COMSAE does not involve a numerical minimum passing score. Instead, based on standard scores, it provides the following three suggested performance levels:

Standard ScorePerformance Level
lower than 400Lower Performance
400 - 649Average Performance
higher than 649Higher Performance

When using the performance profile to assess strengths and weaknesses, examinees should be aware that information provided in content areas consisting of relatively few questions may be less reliable than information provided in content areas with a larger number of questions. Therefore, it is possible that some subtest score patterns are not precisely aligned with a candidate’s numerical score for the total test. COMSAE should not be used to predict performance on the COMLEX-USA cognitive examinations.

You might be familiar with Alin Gragossian, DO, from her blog, A Change of Heart, which provides insight into her experience as an ICU-fellow-on-call turned ICU-survivor.

Originally from Los Angeles, CA, Dr. Gragossian is a 2016 graduate of Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine. From there, she accepted a residency in Emergency Medicine at Drexel Hahnemann in Philadelphia, which was interrupted when she was hospitalized and received an emergency heart transplant in the middle of her third year of residency.

NBOME sat down with Alin to talk about her extraordinary Road to DO Licensure and how she persevered to reach her goals.

 

Let’s start at the very beginning. What first inspired you to become a physician and why did you choose to become a DO specifically?

I can’t tell you of a specific event that inspired me, and I don’t have anyone in my family who is a doctor.  When I was five, a neighbor got hurt on our street and there were a bunch of ambulances. My parents said I was very interested in what was happening. Maybe, subconsciously, my drive to become a doctor came from that experience.

I started volunteering in the ER in high school and I found myself wanting to go there all the time.  I continued volunteering there throughout college, going on to become an EMT and shadowing the same physician. I was driven to do everything in that field.

As to why I chose to become a DO—osteopathic medicine stood out to me because of the way DOs approach the patient. They don’t just look at one part or one system, they look at the patient as a whole. I was intrigued by that as a basic principle.

 

Do you think the osteopathic approach helps a lot in the ER?

When it comes to the more chronic things like back pain, foot pain, or knee pain that have been going on for a while, or patients with chronic conditions, you definitely look at it from a more osteopathic approach. Having that background knowledge absolutely helps

 

There is so much about being a DO that is special and unique. We often hear the phrase ‘osteopathic distinctiveness’ used across the profession. What does that phrase mean to you, personally?

I’m not an MD—it’s not that MDs are no good—it’s just that I went to school to become a DO and that’s my distinction. I’m part of a minority of physicians that went through a special kind of training to learn more about the osteopathic approach to medicine. I’m very proud of being a DO and if the credentials on my badge are mistakenly printed with MD after my name, I will specifically call to get it changed because I really like showing that I’m a DO.

 

Thinking back to your COMLEX-USA Level 1 and 2 prep, what was your approach to studying? 

I took COMLEX-USA Level 1 after my first two years of medical school. We actually had a one month break to take the exam. I would wake up and literally study from 8am until 8pm—I even made a calendar for myself. I would do one topic in the morning, followed by questions in the afternoon.

For COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE and 2-PE, I took them after my third year during rotations and we didn’t have a break to study. Yet, at the same time, that test was more on clinical application, which we did a lot of during practice. It was a lot easier to remember that than the basic science. I would go to my rotation in the morning and in the afternoon, I would dedicate time to studying certain topics and then do questions at night. I definitely had a set way of studying and always allocated a time of day to do it.

 

What advice do you have for students preparing to take COMLEX-USA now?

Just answering questions—do as many question banks as you can possibly get your hands on. It’s not so much about getting the question right—it’s more about learning from what you got wrong by reading the answer and retaining what it was.

 

How would you advise DO students considering residency programs that might not be as familiar with COMLEX-USA?

Talk to somebody in the program, like the program coordinator, about the process.  And if you’re unsure whether or not they are familiar with COMLEX-USA—ask!  And if they don’t accept COMLEX-USA, find out why. Maybe it’s because they’ve never had a DO student before. Maybe it’s because they aren’t sure how it works. For the most part, most programs do accept DO students. There are probably some that historically haven’t, but in the future, everything should be more balanced.

For most of the emergency medicine programs I applied to, I already knew somebody in the program through an emergency medicine interest group at my COM. The program I ended up going to—which was Drexel—even had a resident who was an alumni from LMU-DCOM. Check out the various specialty interest groups at your school, see if there is anyone in a program you are interested in, and ask them for advice.

 

In your 3rd year of residency, you received a heart transplant, how did you pick up where you left off?

I was in the middle of my third year of residency and had just matched into my ICU fellowship. A few weeks later, I got very, very sick. It was so sudden when I went into cardiac arrest and needed a heart transplant. So, instead of starting an ICU fellowship, I became an ICU patient. I went back with 6 months left of residency only to find out that Drexel was shutting down the whole hospital. So not only did I have to work through my health condition, but I also had to find a new program.

During the five months I was recovering, I continued to do board review questions so I wouldn’t forget emergency medicine. Then I found a new program at UPMC Pinnacle in Harrisburg, PA.  Initially, I couldn’t see patients face-to-face because I was still immunosuppressed. I did mini shifts and then finally started seeing patients in October of 2019. The first couple of days were awkward, but muscle memory kicked in and I remembered everything pretty quickly.

I obviously didn’t know I was ever going to need a heart transplant—I’m 30 years old and completely healthy. But I was lucky to be in a residency program that was truly supportive. Faculty, attendings and co-residents were always there for me in case I didn’t feel comfortable or if I needed help.

 

As an ICU-survivor, but also as an ICU-fellow-on-call, you must have experienced some unexpected challenges. Tell me a little about what you’ve overcome to get to where you are on your Road to DO Licensure.

As acute care physicians, there’s always a lot of craziness around us—there could be a code, a trauma, and a stroke all at the same time and you have to know how to stay calm. You can’t just sit there and panic. I don’t know if I was always like this or if emergency medicine shaped me into who I am, but having the ability to stay calm is essential. That’s also what helped me get through my heart transplant. As scary as it was—as annoying, as angry, and as sad as I was—I had to just take it, deal with it, and show people that you can go back to living like you normally would.

 

We know there is already a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety tied to this journey—how did you manage all of it? What worked for you?

You have to have balance. Recently I found out I had been put on the schedule for multiple days in a row without realizing I had two 24s that week and no day off. Speaking up about that is important. I could have been fine that whole week without the day off, but I said something about it and told them, ‘this has been a crazy week for me.’ It ended up just being a mistake. Speaking up when you feel overwhelmed, making time for yourself, and having an outlet is very important.

I personally like to write. That’s just my way of dealing with things. Different people like to do different things—some of my colleagues write music, some of them like to draw, and one of my co-residents even makes videos and has channeled it into doing things related to COVID-19.  Find the thing that makes you happy, know when you feel overwhelmed, and be able to speak up.

 

You just moved to New York City to start the latest chapter of your life. Tell me a little about the Critical Care fellowship you’re currently doing.

I’m doing a critical care fellowship at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. It’s a medicine and surgical-focused two-year multidisciplinary fellowship. We rotate through all of the ICUs throughout the Mount Sinai Hospital system—neuro ICU, transplant ICU, surgical ICU, and medical ICU. At the end, we take the critical care boards. It’s similar to doing a home critical care fellowship, just without the pulmonary part. Most of my peers are all medicine trained—there are a few of us who are emergency medicine trained too so it’s interesting to have a good mix of people around me.

 

What’s next after this? What are you looking forward to the most?

After my fellowship, it would be awesome to stay on the east coast (because it stole my heart, quite literally). I would love to have a job where I do both ER and ICU because I’ll be boarded in both. I want to stay in academics and work with residents, teaching medical students what I know, learned, and experienced.

 

Based on your hands-on experiences, what advice do you have for those who are coming after you?

Don’t let anything stop you. There is going to be a lot that challenges your way of thinking and challenges you personally. There are going to be things that happen to you that you wouldn’t ever think would happen to you. There will be people who tell you that you’re not going to make it, and things that happen that will make you question whether or not you should be doing this. But, at the end of the day, if you really want to do it, don’t let anything stop you.

Feeling inspired by Dr. Gragossian’s story? Become an organ donor and advocate for others to become donors too. There are many myths around organ donation, and it’s important to realize how unfortunate circumstances can breathe new life into someone else who is in need.


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At this point, you’ve researched residency programs until you can’t see straight and are figuring out where to apply, which is never easy. To share some helpful advice we sat down with Carisa Champion, DO, MPH, JD, who opened up about the strategies and game plan she used while applying to residency. Read about what worked for Dr. Champion to see if it will work for you before hitting ‘Submit’ on your residency applications.

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Dr. Champion is currently in the midst of completing her Grey’s Anatomy Surgical Communications Fellowship, and is completing her 4th year as a general surgery resident at the University Of Florida College Of Medicine at Jacksonville, Florida. Before beginning her residency in Florida, she did her first two years in General Surgery in Pennsylvania prior to the program’s closure. Dr. Champion is a graduate of the Nova Southeastern University Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, earning her DO, MPH and JD degrees in 2016. As a former member of the American Osteopathic Association’s Bureau of Emerging Leaders (BEL), Dr. Champion currently serves as a BEL Committee Chair. She is also an active member of the Florida Osteopathic Medical Association (FOMA), working to attract residents to serve on FOMA committees.

The Road to DO Licensure has so many twists and turns and unexpected challenges. Talk to me a little about some of the more major challenges you’ve experienced and have been forced to tackle.

When my original residency program closed, I went from a program that was entirely osteopathic to a completely different world in a large academic Level 1 trauma center. My program has DOs, but there are still programs out there that won’t accept the COMLEX-USA exam, and that can prevent many DO students from applying to them. That’s something that I’ve been working against since I was a student. Any time I learned about a residency program that did not accept COMLEX-USA for DO applicants, I would contact the AOA or the NBOME and ask them to reach out to the program. Personally, I refused to take the USMLE examination. For me, it was important that I had chosen osteopathic medicine from the start, and I only wanted to go to programs that were going to accept my osteopathic credentials and not because of what exam I took. Ultimately, you need to decide what your priorities are and what is most important to you.

How would you advise DO students considering residency programs that might not be as familiar or accept COMLEX-USA scores?

I think that it depends on what you’re applying for because there are still some specialties that are difficult about accepting COMLEX-USA. When I come across those programs, I try and broker the relationship to show them that COMLEX-USA exists because we are a distinct profession and need to be evaluated as such. And I think that’s something that’s special that we bring to our programs—we DOs bring a special culture and background with us, and it benefits the programs to take DOs. I think that our heritage is something that is beneficial to patients and I think it’s something that DO students should be proud of and not something that they should try to hide.

What are some tips you would give DO students who are preparing to apply to residency?

I always tell students to figure out what their priorities are because it’s different for everyone. If your priorities are specialty, location, strong community, emphasis on research, or a community that values mental health, those are all things that you need to look at and apply to programs with those priorities in mind. Honor your priorities because it’s a big decision, and you’re going to spend a lot of your life in that place. It’s really beneficial when you choose the places you want to interview at so you can make sure they’re places that will have your priorities in mind. Make sure it’s a good fit for the program and a good fit for you. I think it’s so important that you rank places in the order of where you think you fit in well. I didn’t even rank places if I felt I’d be miserable there. Why would I want to spend five to six years of my life miserable when I could be somewhere I feel like I’m a good fit?

There is a perception that applying to residency has gotten so much more competitive—many students are applying to more and more programs every year. How many programs did you apply to and interview at? And how did you land where you are today?

My priority was to only apply to osteopathic residencies, and at the time, I think there were only about 20-30 surgical residencies that were osteopathic. It goes back to what I said about considering your priorities. A lot of it comes down to doing the best you can in your COMLEX-USA exams, getting good letters of recommendation, and volunteering for causes that you really care about.

Be authentic in the things that you’re passionate about—in the things you choose to pursue. I was really involved in medical school, and it wasn’t because I wanted titles or recognition. I was really passionate about a lot of things, and because I was passionate about them, I was able to be more effective. An unintended consequence was that I had a much better application because I went really far with the things I was passionate about. I had the energy to do that—it wasn’t just an obligation—I was excited about the opportunities it brought me. Do things that you’re passionate about, let your application reflect who you truly are. I think everything works out the way it needs to in that way, if you’re genuinely honoring who you are.

What skills did you bring to the table during your interview that made you stand out as an applicant?

In osteopathic medicine, we have a culture of attracting people to our profession who have grit, have had unique life experiences, and have an intentionality about them. There’s just a culture in our profession that is different—one that I recognized as healthy and part of why I chose osteopathic medicine. When I interviewed for residency, there was something about my interest in being involved, my interest in preventative benefits, and my genuine passion for healthcare that my program recognized and felt would be a good fit. I’ve been part of the profession now for 14 years, and our profession is still working to find the right words we can all agree on to define osteopathic distinctiveness. While it’s hard to define, it’s definitely there.


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Breanne Jaqua, DO, MPH

Dr. Jaqua recently completed a residency in Emergency Medicine at the Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center in Toledo, OH and is now an Assistant Professor at the A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona. She currently serves as the 2019-2021 Resident Representative to the ACGME’s Emergency Medicine Review Committee and the 2020-2021 Vice Chair to the ACGME’s Council of Review Committee Residents. She is also on the Board of the Emergency Medicine Residents Association (EMRA).

Eleanora Yeiser, DO

Dr. Yeiser is currently a PGY-3 family medicine resident at Main Line Health in Bryn Mawr, PA. She currently serves as a NBOME Resident Ambassador, and works to advocate for DO students and their credentials. Her professional involvements include reviewing articles for the Osteopathic Family Physician Journal. She is a member of the Pennsylvania Osteopathic Medical Association Committee on Professional Guidance (East Region) and serves on her resident wellness and diversity committees. After residency, she will be relocating to northern New Jersey to practice outpatient family medicine.

Ronak Mistry, DO

Dr. Mistry is currently Chief Resident at Pennsylvania Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Health System/Penn Medicine in Philadelphia, PA. He started there as an internal medicine resident in 2017, and is currently applying for fellowships in hematology-oncology for the 2021 Match cycle.

Researching Programs

Making the decision about what residency programs to apply to is probably one of the biggest decisions you make in your career. How did you approach researching programs?

EY: I started with the non-negotiables, which, for me, was location. With residency comes a new set of stressors and demands. For the sake of my well-being, it was essential to be as close as possible to my spouse, my family and my friends. Consider settings that will allow you to gain experience with a patient population that will help you meet future goals; decide what’s best for you in the long-term, but also consider the short-term.

BJ: If I were researching programs today, I would definitely use EMRA Match to learn about emergency medicine programs. This tool is amazing and serves as an alternative to residency program listings or ranking websites and allows applicants to easily filter information. For EM applicants, EMRA Match is a treasure-trove of information. I got engaged during my residency application cycle and it would have been extremely difficult for my fiancé to relocate, so I put significant emphasis on the geographic location of the program. Participating in a “second look” visit at a few of my top choice programs after the formal interview day was also very helpful. This 3-4 hour shadow experience let me observe the flow of the emergency department and experience real-time interactions among residents, faculty, nurses, and staff outside of the formal interview setting.

RM: The first decision to make is what kind of setting you see yourself training in: a large academic institution, an academic-affiliated community institution or a community hospital. Each different setting provides different opportunities, so it’s important to determine where you see yourself. The second decision is going to be location. Although I didn’t think this was as important at first, as I went through my interviews I realized that location was more important than I had initially thought. Was I okay with being somewhere rural? Was I okay with being hours away from my family and friends? Was I okay with the options to enjoy life outside of the hospital, including outdoor activities, locations for shopping and restaurants? Once I answered these questions, I used websites like FREIDA, though the American Medical Association, to help narrow my choices.

What were the most important factors to you when you were considering different programs?

EY: Size, curriculum, and fit were important considerations for me. I wanted to train at a medium sized program. I also wanted to be in a program large enough that there was enough diversity and resources, but not so large that I became lost in the crowd. At the same time, I wanted to be in a program small enough that I could get enough individual attention, personalization and mentorship in my training. It’s important to consider the type of environment you will thrive in. I wanted to train at a place that felt like a good fit for me, which is not always something you can research — it’s more about intuition.

RM: The location and the type of program were very important to me up-front. Next, I looked at the types of rotations residents did and resident outcomes — not every program is the same. Some programs put an emphasis on getting residents into fellowships, while others are geared at molding future primary care doctors. It’s important to pick a program with a track record consistent with what you see yourself doing in the future, but also with enough flexibility and guidance in the institution to help you if you change your mind. When I was at the interviews, I was most interested in culture — what was the interaction like amongst the residents, attending physicians, and fellows? This is so important because you will spend countless hours at the hospital and it’s important that you work in an environment that is supportive and collegial, where you are not afraid to ask questions and have the opportunity to grow as a physician.

I will say, it is important to acknowledge that this year is somewhat unique since interviews are virtual. Being about halfway through my own interview season, do not let this dismay you. A lot of the information that we all want to know about is objective – schedules, vacations, educational opportunities. These are the same things that we would have read about on program websites, in emails, when talking to residents in the program and in program presentations. But culture is hard to gauge virtually. The best way to assess this is attend any and all opportunities you get to interact with current house staff and askthem about culture. I think a good metric to use is to see if you are getting consistent answers about what makes that place special to train in.

Applying and Interviewing

When you created your rank order list, how did you know that the programs would be right for you?

EY: I started by knowing which programs were not the right fit—you have to trust your instincts. No program is perfect, and you can’t truly learn everything or anticipate everything that may arise; the only way to get a true sense of it is once you are actually immersed. The same way you are putting your best foot forward, programs are doing the same. I would avoid putting too much emphasis on any one program feature. This year has shown us that things can change suddenly. Additionally, your interests, desires and needs can change as well. Programs change too — they grow and evolve just as you do throughout this process. Keeping that in mind, I recommend ranking programs based on where you think you would be genuinely the happiest.

RM: At the end of the day, I realized that many of my programs were similar and that I was lucky that I saw myself being happy being at any of the places I interviewed. The culture of the program and the feeling I got when I spoke to the residents was what ultimately helped me decide the order. I am happy to say that I was totally right about that “gut instinct”, having just completed residency at my top choice program this past June, and now being a Chief Resident and Hospitalist at this program!

We know residency programs come in all shapes and sizes and in towns big and small. As you looked for the program that was right for you, what major differences did you notice between rural and urban programs? And do you think this has an impact on training in certain specialties (fewer cases, etc.)?

RM: The biggest difference in rural vs. urban programs is the diversity of patients and access to different medical interventions. I found that in rural programs, oftentimes their patients tended to be more homogenous and the medical problems could, therefore, be limited. Furthermore, access to the latest innovations in healthcare may be limited. In an urban setting, particularly in a large city, I found more diversity in patient populations and medical conditions. That being said, many rural programs, especially very large academic hospitals, have huge catchment areas, so do not be fooled by what shows up.

What advice do you have for current applicants who are interviewing? What should they keep an eye out for?

EY: Be yourself. Every place where you interview will not be the best fit for you, but you can use each interview experience to help with the next. Don’t be afraid to ask questions — you can even ask a few of the same questions at different interviews to help compare programs and build your list. Talk to the residents and staff to get a sense of the program and its culture. Ask about the program’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic in different settings. How did they adapt to current and evolving circumstances? Did the residents feel safe and adequately supported?

How do you recommend applicants position their osteopathic education as a distinguishing characteristic to residency programs?

BJ: Approximately one quarter of medical students in the country are osteopathic medical students, and the interview is a great time to describe what your osteopathic medical education means to you. You can highlight school-specific initiatives you started or participated in, or emphasize unique aspects of the educational program at your school. One of many ways to emphasize your osteopathic credentials is to highlight in your personal statement or interview how your osteopathic education has shaped your journey in medicine. You may want to seek out programs that are accredited by the ACGME with Osteopathic Recognition, which signifies to prospective applicants that the program is dedicated to continuing osteopathic education in residency and/or fellowship training.


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The credentialing board enlisted the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners to adapt its qualifying exam to the virtual space.

CHICAGO, IL Pandemic-driven necessity has led to new innovation in medical examinations, as proven by a recent collaboration between the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery (ABCS) and the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME). The ABCS, a credentialing board for surgeons specializing in cosmetic medicine and surgery, needed to find a physically-distanced way to hold its annual exam, which is usually conducted in-person. By collaborating with NBOME, they built an equally rigorous board certification exam that can be virtually delivered and assessed.

The testing experts at NBOME collaborate with numerous organizations, using a breadth of cutting-edge medical credential examination processes and technologies. The NBOME analyzed what processes would be needed to realize the ABCS’s goals for the examination, including confidentiality, private interview spaces, “movement” through the exam, and secure online scoring. They then created a virtual testing center and file sharing option that could accommodate these needs and worked behind the scenes to transition examiners and candidates throughout the examination, allowing participants to focus on the work of interviewing and being interviewed. The exam thus met the high standards of the ABCS while working seamlessly for all involved.

ABCS President Dr. Wilbur Hah praised the NBOME testing administrators’ work customizing their technology to support the ABCS’s rigorous exam process. He credited the success, in part, to the collaborative relationship between the two organizations.

“Having an established relationship with NBOME allowed us to dive into the process of adapting our exam as soon as it became clear that the pandemic would require us to take a different approach,” said Dr. Hah. “Board certification is core to our mission of promoting the safe and ethical practice of cosmetic surgery, and we are pleased to continue our work without interruption.”

“We love to innovate and find collaboration with our strategic partners a great opportunity to do so,” shared Gretta A. Gross, DO, MEd, Vice President for Clinical Skills Testing. “For the ABCS, we were able to start with their in-person examination processes and develop a virtual solution around it, all while keeping their mission and goal of providing a valid examination at the forefront of the process.”

With an ever-increasing demand for cosmetic procedures that has persisted through the pandemic, American Board of Cosmetic Surgery board certification remains a critical signal to patients, proving a surgeon’s knowledge and experience. Prior to undergoing the examination process, surgeons must have a primary board certification in a surgical specialty and then complete a cosmetic surgery fellowship, including performing 300 or more cosmetic procedures. ABCS certification goes beyond training and examination: it also requires diplomates to operate only in accredited facilities, prioritize patient safety at all times, and meet strict standards for conduct.

In a time when those working in telemedicine and education struggle to translate high standards to the virtual space, the organizations were celebratory. Dr. Hah surveyed the board members who served as examiners: “Would they give the exam virtually again?” While all said they missed the camaraderie afforded by the annual in-person gathering, the answer was a resounding “yes.”

Fantastic news to share with US-educated doctors of osteopathic medicine who are interested in practicing in Australia — The Medical Board of Australia just established a new registration pathway for DOs, recognizing the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) as a competent authority. This means that US DO graduates who have successfully completed the NBOME’s COMLEX-USA examination series since 2005, and have also completed two years of an ACGME- or AOA-accredited residency program will be qualified for provisional registration. “Registration” is the term used in numerous other countries for what we refer to as “medical licensure” in the United States.”

According to the Medical Board of Australia, until recently, doctors who had been awarded the DO degree in the United States were eligible only for limited registration in Australia. The new pathway streamlines the registration process and enables US DOs to be granted general registration after 12 months of supervised practice in Australia. In Australia, “DO USA” refers to physicians with a degree in osteopathic medicine to avoid confusion amongst patients with other types of health practitioners who hold qualifications in osteopathy.

The NBOME is the first international authority to receive competent authority for medical licensure in Australia in 15 years. The evaluation by the Medical Board of Australia included a robust and comprehensive review of the COMLEX-USA examination series, the licensure examination for DOs in the USA. COMLEX-USA Levels 1 and 2 (which includes a clinical skills evaluation) are also required by the American Osteopathic Association–Commission for Osteopathic College Accreditation (AOA-COCA) for graduation from a college of osteopathic medicine. The NBOME provided extensive documentation demonstrating adherence to quality assurance standards for validity, reliability, defensibility, and fairness to assess whether the COMLEX-USA examination program’s processes result in physicians who have the knowledge, clinical skills and professional attributes necessary to practice in the medical profession in Australia.

“Registration in Australia is all about safety to practice,” shared Dr. Anne Tonkin, Chair of the Medical Board of Australia, “We have streamlined our process and continue to welcome DO USA graduates so they can contribute to our profession and our community.”

The news was especially welcome to Nayla Boulad, DO, who submitted her application under the new pathway as soon as it was available and is eager to be able to practice osteopathic medicine in her new home in Australia. After completing her residency training in Pediatrics at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington this summer, Dr. Boulad relocated to Perth, Australia to be nearer to her husband’s family, “I was literally working on my application when I got this fantastic news. I cannot believe the timing, this is so great!” she shared.

Prior to the Board’s recognition of the NBOME and COMLEX-USA, Dr. Boulad was preparing to complete the standard pathway application, a process that entailed extensive requirements, including completing another residency in Australia and taking other medical licensing examinations “In a time where travel and immigration is severely curtailed due to COVID-19, Australia faces a shortage of doctors and I am happy to have the opportunity to start working to fill those gaps. I am looking forward to continuing my learning and training here with hopes to be able to share what I learn with my peers back in the US.”

NBOME President and CEO, John R. Gimpel, DO, MEd, commented on the significant achievement and milestone for US DOs, NBOME’s COMLEX-USA examination program, and (former) AOA-accredited residency programs, now accredited by the ACGME. “Australia joins all United States medical licensing boards in entrusting NBOME’s COMLEX-USA program in the medical licensing process, on the merits of the evidence and the rigor of the exam program,” said Dr. Gimpel, “This is exciting news for DOs, the osteopathic medical profession, and the patients and communities of Australia. A special thanks to the AOA, the Australian Medical Council, the Medical Board of Australia, and all across the profession in the US and Australia who collaborated for more than a decade to make this a reality.”

PHILADELPHIA, PA.  The National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME), an independent, not-for-profit organization who provides testing for osteopathic medical licensure, is pleased to share news that the Medical Board of Australia recently established a new pathway for osteopathic physicians to become registered to practice medicine in Australia.

Referred to as Category G UNITED STATES National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME), this new pathway enables US educated DO applicants who have passed all levels of COMLEX-USA (including the Level 2-Performance Evaluation/clinical skills exam) and completed at least two years in a residency training program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and/or by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) to apply for provisional registration for medical practice in Australia. The evaluation by the Medical Board of Australia included a robust and comprehensive review of the COMLEX-USA examination series, including NBOME’s high standards for quality assurance in areas such as validity, reliability, defensibility and fairness. COMLEX-USA is the first international program to receive competency authority for medical licensure in 15 years.

“Australia joins all United States medical licensing boards in entrusting NBOME’s COMLEX-USA program in the medical licensing process, on the merits of the evidence and the rigor of the exam program,” said NBOME President & CEO, John R. Gimpel, DO, MEd. “This is exciting news for DOs, the osteopathic medical profession, and the patients and communities of Australia. Kudos and special thanks to everyone across the profession in the USA as well as in Australia who collaborated to make this a reality.”

 

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About the NBOME
NBOME is an independent, non-governmental, non-profit assessment organization committed to protecting the public by providing the means to assess competencies for osteopathic medicine and related health care professions. NBOME’s COMLEX-USA examination series is a requirement for graduation from colleges of osteopathic medicine and provides the pathway to licensure for osteopathic physicians in the United States and numerous international jurisdictions.

Media Inquiries
Susan Peters, Director of Marketing and Communications
speters@nbome.org

Each year since 1991, the NBOME Board of Directors has convened its annual Liaison Committee Meeting, hosting representatives from organizations from across the continuum of osteopathic medical education and the house of medicine. The committee meets to share their experiences, ideas and concerns as they pertain to NBOME assessments as well as other challenges and opportunities facing the profession. This year’s Liaison Committee, while transitioned to a virtual and somewhat shortened format, was attended by 20 leaders from 12 different organizations, including members of the undergraduate and graduate medical education community from AACOM, AOGME, OPDA, ACGME; osteopathic medical students and residents from COSGP, SOMA, and the AOA-Bureau of Emerging Leaders; members of the licensure community from AAOE and FSMB; and professional organizations — AOA, AMA. NBOME also welcomed, for the first time ever, the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), who shared results from the 2020 Program Director Survey, including a record high 86% of ACGME residency directors requiring COMLEX-USA for DO applicants.

This year’s Liaison Committee Meeting theme, chosen even before the pandemic, was Professional identity formation across the continuum — from medical education through practice. Dr. Geraldine O’Shea chaired the meeting with support from Board Vice-Chair Richard LaBaere, DO, and NBOME President and CEO, John R. Gimpel, DO, MEd. NBOME was further represented by members of the NBOME team, including Liaison Committee Lead, Sandra Waters, MEM, Melissa Turner, MS, and Marie Fleury, DO, MBA.

Following NBOME and COMLEX-USA updates, participants engaged in a facilitated discussion focused on COMLEX-USA scoring (numeric vs. pass/fail), osteopathic distinctiveness, and strategies to advance professional identity formation for DO students, residents, and practicing physicians. Participants showed support for NBOME’s agility and innovation throughout the pandemic, including the creation of a COM Liaison Team, development of COMAT self-proctored administration options, and enhanced collaboration with Prometric to test over 14,000 displaced COMLEX-USA candidates this summer.

Historically, this process has resulted in numerous opportunities to make improvements to NBOME initiatives, products and services. These improvements have shown to help meet the evolving needs of our candidates, colleges of osteopathic medicine, the licensing community, and others who rely on what we DO. The NBOME Liaison Committee meeting enables us to continue to promote a culture of collaboration, while endeavoring to continuously improve as we serve others and remain steadfast in our mission to protect the public via high-quality, valid and reliable assessment.

COMLEX-USA Computer-Based Examination Outline
SectionQuestions
150Morning Session: 4 Hours Total Testing Time
Questions can be answered, reviewed, and changed one section at a time. Individual sections are not timed.
250
Authorized 10-minute break
350
450
Authorized 40-minute lunch break
550Afternoon Session: 4 Hours Total Testing Time
Questions can be answered, reviewed, and changed one section at a time. Individual sections are not timed.
650
Authorized 10-minute break
750
850

Available Examination Features

Examination Review Screen
A review page is presented for each subsection. This provides candidates with information about the status of the items in the current subsection, which includes questions completed, questions marked for further review, and questions left incomplete (i.e., no answer is given).

Advancing through Examination Subsections
Once a subsection is completed, the candidate cannot return to review or change any answers within that subsection.

Time Limitations
Although each section is four hours in total, individual subsections are untimed. A clock is provided to assist with time management. Warnings are given of the time remaining before the end of each four-hour section.

Examination Visual References
Use of an “Exhibit” button may be required in order to see graphic materials related to a test question. These “Exhibits” consist of images, video or audio avatars. In some cases, two “Exhibits” may be used in order to answer a question.

Additional Tools
New functional features have been added, including a built-in standard calculator and lab values with reference ranges (where applicable) embedded directly into test questions and clinical cases. These features were made available during the COMLEX-USA 2017–18 new test cycles for each examination.

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM), American Osteopathic Association (AOA), Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA) and the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) have been working together on numerous challenges presented by the COVID-19 crisis. Read our joint statement in support of COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and COCA’s temporary modification of graduation.
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) American Osteopathic Association (AOA) National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME)


Joint Statement from AACOM, AOA, COCA and NBOME:
Support of COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and COCA’s Temporary Modification of Graduation
Standards for the DO Class of 2021

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM), American Osteopathic Association (AOA), Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA) and the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) have been working together on numerous challenges presented by the COVID-19 crisis. One such challenge is balancing the importance of appropriate testing and assessment for evaluation of students with the safety of testing and travel to testing centers, including the COMLEX-USA examination series that is administered by NBOME.

Today our organizations stand together in support of COCA’s decision to provide deans of accredited COMs the discretion to allow students who would otherwise be scheduled to be in the 2021 graduating class the option to graduate and receive the DO degree without having passed the COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE clinical skills examination, provided they have met all other graduation requirements and have been endorsed by the faculty.

COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE will still need to be completed for full licensure and is considered a necessary and ongoing requirement for the licensure of osteopathic physicians in all 50 states. This announcement does not affect COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE, although the availability of testing opportunities for this exam is being monitored very closely.

This decision helps to address some of the undue burdens placed upon our osteopathic medical students and ensures a pathway to graduation. It allows additional flexibility for students as to testing when it best meets their needs and personal circumstances given the pandemic.

AACOM, AOA, COCA, and NBOME remain committed to the valid, standardized measurement of clinical skills for licensure as part of our profession’s commitment to our patients’ safety and protection and the quality of healthcare overall, while acknowledging and preserving the interests and needs of our osteopathic medical students.


AACOM, AOA, COCA and NBOME are committed to serving our profession, collaboratively, but also individually through the distinct and specific services each of our organizations provides. To better understand how we work together, each organization’s unique contributions and roles are defined below.

About AACOM

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) was founded in 1898 to lend support and assistance to the nation’s osteopathic medical schools, and to serve as a unifying voice for osteopathic medical education. The organization represents the administration, faculty and students of all osteopathic medical colleges in the United States and is actively involved in all areas of osteopathic medical education, including graduate medical education. Visit AACOM.org for more information, or ChooseDO.org for information about applying to osteopathic medical school.

About AOA

The American Osteopathic Association (AOA) represents nearly 151,000 osteopathic physicians (DOs) and osteopathic medical students; promotes public health; encourages scientific research; serves as the primary certifying body (specialty board certification) for DOs. To learn more about DOs and the osteopathic philosophy of medicine, visit DoctorsThatDO.org.

About COCA

The AOA Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA) is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as the accreditor of colleges of osteopathic medicine. COCA accreditation signifies that a college has met or exceeded the Commission’s standards for educational quality. COCA is a division of the AOA, but operates independently to serve its role of accrediting colleges of osteopathic medicine.

About NBOME

The National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) is an independent, nongovernmental, not-for-profit organization whose mission is to protect the public by providing the means to assess competencies for osteopathic medicine and related health care professions. The NBOME develops and administers a number of osteopathically distinct examinations, most notably the COMLEX-USA (Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination of the United States), which is accepted for medical licensure in all 50 of the United States and other licensing jurisdictions. Visit NBOME.org for more information.

As part of our continued outreach and engagement with the osteopathic community related to COVID-19 and its impact on candidate testing, NBOME hosted webinars with COM Faculty and Candidates. Sessions included an update from John Gimpel DO MEd, President and CEO of NBOME followed by Q&A with attendees.
As part of our continued outreach and engagement with the osteopathic community related to COVID-19 and its impact on candidate testing, NBOME recently hosted webinars with COM Faculty and Candidates. These sessions included an update from John Gimpel DO MEd, President and CEO of NBOME followed by Q&A with attendees.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS. 
We appreciate the many questions and comments we’ve received, as they heighten our awareness and understanding of the very real impact the pandemic has had on candidates and other stakeholders. A list of FAQs from these sessions is available here.


Challenges in the Face of COVID-19 | May 29, 2020

COM Deans & Faculty Session | May 20, 2020

Student & Resident Session | May 21, 2020

The NBOME is proud to be a member of the Coalition for Physician Accountability, a collaborative group of national medical education organizations. The members of the Coalition recently unanimously supported a resolution recommending exemption of physicians from the Department of Homeland Security’s proposed rule change to eliminate “duration of status” as an authorized period of stay for J-1 Physicians.

We are proud to stand in support of all J-1 physicians in training – they are our classmates, educators, colleagues and friends. Most importantly, they are an essential part of the patient care workforce.

Read more here.

MAY 11, 2020
The NBOME is proud to join others as part of the Coalition for Physician Accountability, a cross-organizational group of national medical education organizations.  This group has recently developed a shared approach to several urgent COVID-19 related educational and training issues impacting the medical education and regulatory communities, with specific focus on applicants and education programs preparing for the 2020-2021 academic year during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Coalition’s recommendations focus on three major areas:
  • VSLO/Away Rotations
  • In-person interviews for residency, and
  • ERAS deadline changes
The Coalition convened a series of work groups whose participants featured diversity of thought and represented the full spectrum of stakeholders across medical education and the public. These recommendations are intended to add to, but not supersede, the independent judgment of a medical school, Sponsoring Institution, or residency/fellowship program regarding the immediate needs of its patients and preparation of its learners. Read more here:

APRIL 9, 2020

Collective Statement from the Coalition for Physician Accountability

The NBOME worked with organizations across the House of Medicine and endorses this collective statement to strengthen efforts that must be in place to safeguard the public, and protect our health care workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Click here to read the full statement.


Jon Bardahl, DO, is currently training in pediatric medicine at OSF HealthCare. In the upcoming academic year starting in July 2020, Dr. Bardahl will be starting his fellowship in pediatric hematology-oncology at Duke University. Prior to medical school, Dr. Bardahl received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Governor’s State University and earned his osteopathic medical degree from Midwestern University in Chicago, Illinois. Throughout the years, Dr. Bardahl has been a consistent advocate for osteopathic medicine, and has been highly involved with the NBOME as a Resident Ambassador helping to spread information regarding COMLEX-USA to various student groups and stakeholder through social media.

 

You’ve almost finished your residency – we hear a fellowship is your next step, tell us about that — what made you choose hematology-oncology as a subspecialty?

I’m excited to be starting Pediatric Hematology-Oncology fellowship this July at Duke Children’s Hospital. I have been interested in cancer biology for some time, and have been lucky enough to be able to pursue it. Prior to medical school I conducted research on a protein expressed by Epstein-Barr virus and its influence when it comes to tumor development in certain cancers. While in medical school, I got involved in the St. Baldrick’s Foundation which helps raise money for childhood cancer research in exchange for participants shaving their heads. In residency I truly developed an appreciation for the field and loved the continuity with patients and their families, the pathology, the opportunity for research, and advocacy opportunities involved in the field.

 

Any advice for DO students and residents who might be thinking about completing a fellowship?

I think the biggest advice I would give any upcoming student or resident is to find a mentor and “pick” their brain. I have had so many mentors along the way that have influenced me both personally and professionally and I’m so grateful for the lessons I have learned and the advice they have given me.

 

You only took COMLEX-USA when you applied to residency – what was your thinking about that?

I’m a proud DO and fully support COMLEX-USA! I was only interested in residency programs that supported COMLEX-USA as well so the USMLE was never something I considered.

 

How would you advise DO students today in considering a specialty?

Students should try to keep an open mind when it comes to medicine. If they have a specialty they are interested in, they can identify mentors or research opportunities which may be helpful when applying to residency programs.

 

What about applying to residency?

Here are some things that I would recommend doing:

 

How would you advise DO students considering programs that might not be as familiar or accept COMLEX-USA scores?

Reach out to programs and ask them! If a program is unfamiliar you can always supply them with resources from the NBOME website or notify NBOME so they can advocate on your behalf.

 

Applying to residency has gotten so stressful – students are applying to more programs every year. How many programs did you apply to and interview at?

I applied to 20-30 programs for both residency and fellowship and I interviewed at 10-12 programs.

 

Did you do an audition rotation at your residency or fellowship program?

I did not. Audition rotations are a wonderful opportunity to learn and get a “feel” for a program, but it’s not mandatory. I have loved training at my current residency program and don’t think an audition rotation would have changed that.

What are some tips you would give DO students who are preparing to apply to residency?

These are some of the things that worked for me, and I hope they help others as well:

Were you always interested in pediatrics? When did you know that’s what you wanted to do and how did you decide that’s what you wanted to do?

Pediatrics was at the top of my list! I did consider family medicine at one point as well, but decided to pursue pediatric medicine after my 3rd year core rotation in pediatrics. I have always been interested in pathology and academic medicine, and wanted the opportunity to specialize in Hematology-Oncology to provide continuity of care by working with patients and their parents.


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Hotaka Maeda, PhD, Xiaolin Wang, PhD, Stuart Barnum, MA, Mark Dawley, MBA, and Tsung-Hsun Tsai, PhD.  Score Relationship of COMLEX-USA Level 1, COMSAE Phase 1, and COMAT FBS Comprehensive Examinations. Paper presented (virtually) at the 2020 American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Annual Conference, March 2020

Browne, M, Wojnakowski M, Horber DT. Choosing Wisely: So Many Options for Assessment Administration. Which will Enhance Your Exam’s Validity and Fairness? Paper presented at the 2019 Innovations in Testing Conference, Orlando FL, March 2019.

Castaneda R, Hudson KM, Wang, X. Uncovering Hidden Response Time Patterns of COMLEX-USA Level 3 Examination. Poster presented at the 2019 American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Annual Conference, Washington, DC, April 2019.

Errichetti A. Standardizing Judgment: A Qualitative Study of How SPs Co-Construct Meaning. Presentation delivered at the 2019 Association For Standardized Patient Educators Annual Conference, Orland, FL, June 2019.

Errichetti A. Debriefing Residents with Good Judgment. Presentation delivered at New York Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Educational Consortium, New York City, NY, April 2019.

Horber DT, Waters S CATALYST: Transforming Physicians’ Assessment into Learning.  Presentation delivered the 2019 Meeting of the American Board of Medical Specialties, Chicago, IL, September 2019.

Hudson KM, Yin Y, Tsai, TH. Transitioning to Automated Test Assembly: A Comparison of Equating Methods. Paper presented at the 2019 National Council of Measurement in Education Conference, Toronto, Canada, April 2019.

Maeda H, Wang X. The effects of test familiarity on person-fit and aberrant behavior. Paper presented at the 2019 National Council of Measurement in Education Conference, Toronto, Canada, April 2019.

Mirigliani L, Lorion, A.  When Life Gets in the Way: Getting SPs out of Their Heads and into the Role.  Presentation delivered at the 2019 Association for Standardized Patient Educators Annual Conference, Orlando, FL, June 2019.

Parshall C, Julian E, Parikh S, Horber DT. Using Nudges for More Effective Exam Programs. Paper presented at the 2019 Innovations in Testing Conference, Orlando FL, March 2019.

Ronkowksi E. “Collaborative Cognitive Item Mapping” as part of Innovations in Assessment, Learning, and Improvement: Lightning Round Part 1. Presentation delivered at the 2019 Meeting of the American Board of Medical Specialties, Chicago, IL, September 2019.

Shaeffer D, Waters S.  Ensuring Ongoing Physician Competency with CATALYST.  Presentation delivered at the 2019 Meeting of the International Association of Medical Regulatory Authorities, Chicago, IL, September 2019.

Presentation Archives
Errichetti A, Fancher S. Standardized Patient Communication Assessment in Medical and Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Two Perspectives. Podium presentation abstract submitted for 18th International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare, Los Angeles, January 13-17, 2018.
Errichetti A, Drda V, Kachur E. Using the ORID Framework to Conduct Difficult Conversations with SPs. International Meeting of Simulation in Healthcare, Los Angeles, January 13-17, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update and Item Writing Workshop. Presented to faculty and students at the University of Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, San Antonio, TX, January 24, 2018.
Waters S. Best Practices in Testing. Presentation to the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Osteopathic Specialties Summit, Austin, TX, January 27, 2018.
O’Shea GT and Waters S. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented at the American Association of Osteopathic Examiners Business Meeting, Austin, TX, January 27, 2018.
O’Brien K, Ronkowski E. Refereeing Your Item References. Presentation was delivered at the 2018 Association of Test Publishers (ATP), San Antonio, TX, February 2018.
Gimpel JR and Shaffer DC. NBOME Update to AOA Board of Trustees & Affiliates. Presented at the American Osteopathic Association’s Midyear Business Meeting, Fort Lauderdale, FL, February 28, 2018.
Gimpel JR and Waters S. Resources for Program Coordinators for Understanding and Using COMLEX-USA. Presented at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s Annual Educational Conference, Orlando, FL, March 1, 2018.
Gimpel JR and Shaffer DC. Use of COMLEX-USA Examination Program in ACGME Programs. Presented at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s Annual Educational Conference, Orlando, FL, March 3, 2018.
Gimpel JR. Assessment for Lifelong Learning in Your Medical Career: Starting with COMLEX-USA. Presented at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Becher Family Lectureship, Philadelphia, PA, March 12, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME Spring Visitation 2018. Presented to guests attending the Spring Visitation Day in Philadelphia Executive Offices, Conshohocken, PA, April 9, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine’s Educational Council on Osteopathic Principles Meeting in Stratford, NJ, April 13, 2018.
Flamini J, Gimpel JR and Tsai ET. Preparing for Changes to the COMLEX-USA & COMAT Examination Programs. Presented as a Pre-Conference Workshop at the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine’s Annual Conference in Washington, DC, April 17, 2018.
Roberts WL. An investigation of a rater-mediated licensing performance examination equating quality with the Rasch model. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Conference, NY, April 2018.
Horber DT, Flamini J. CATALYST: the continuous assessment platform for physician learning. Presented at the American Association of Osteopathic Medical Colleges (AACOM), Washington DC, April 18, 2018.
Shao C, Wang Y, Liu S, Tsai ET. Investigation of Differential Item Functioning on COMLEX-USA Examination Series. Poster was presented at the American Association of Osteopathic Medical Colleges (AACOM), Washington DC, April 18, 2018.
Gallagher LA. A Comparative Review of the Factors Which May Influence Residency Program Interviews & Ranking. Poster was presented at the American Association of Osteopathic Medical Colleges (AACOM), Washington DC, April 18, 2018.
Gimpel JR and Shaffer DC. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine’s Board of Deans in Washington, DC, April 19, 2018.
Flamini J, Gimpel JR, Shaffer DC and Tsai ET. NBOME Update Luncheon Presentation. Presented during the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine’s Annual Conference in Washington, DC, April 20, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the Council of Osteopathic Student Government Presidents during the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine’s Annual Conference in Washington, DC, April 20, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented at the American Association of Osteopathic Examiners Business Meeting, Charlotte, NC, April 27, 2018.
Waters S. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the American College of Osteopathic Internists Trainers Congress, Chicago, IL, April 28, 2018.
Gimpel JR and Shaffer DC. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the Federation of State Medical Board Annual Meeting, Charlotte, NC, April 28, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the Organization of Program Director Association during the Council of Medical Specialty Society’s Biannual Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 11, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update and Item Writing Workshop. Presented to the faculty and students at Rowan School of Osteopathic Medicine, NJ, May 18, 2018.
Lorion, A, Mirigliani L. When Grief Isn’t Simulated: SPs Dealing with Real-life Death. Presented to the Association of Standardized Patient Educators, Kansas City, MO, June 18, 2018.
Errichetti A, Drda V, Kachur E. Lank A, Lorion A. Using the ORID Framework to Conduct Difficult Conversations with SPs. International Meeting of Simulation in Healthcare, Association of Standardized Patient Educators Annual Conference. June 20, 2018.
Murphy J, Errichetti A. Training Standardized Patients in a Flipped Classroom. Association of Standardized Patient Educators Annual Conference. June 20, 2018.
Castaneda R, Zhang Q. Automated Item Generation Using Medical Diagnostic Information. Poster presentation at the International Meeting of the Psychometric Society, New York, New York, July 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the American Osteopathic Association’s Annual Board of Trustees Meeting, Chicago, IL, July 18, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the Council of Osteopathic Student Government President’s Meeting during the AOA Annual BOT Meeting, Chicago, IL, July 18, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation Meeting, Chicago, IL, August 24, 2018.
Bruel L, Errichetti A, Kachur E, Novak D, Jiraeviijinda. Linking Professionalism and Communication Skills in OCSE Stations. EACH International Association for Communication in Healthcare, University of Porto, Portugal, September 2, 2018.
Ferris M, Horber D. Examinee References and Resources: Steps toward Open-Book Testing and Innovative Item Development. Presented at the 2018 American Board of Medical Specialties Conference, Las Vegas, NV, September 2018
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update and Item Writing Workshop. Presented to faculty and students at Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine, Meridian, ID, September 5, 2018.
Finley JM. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to faculty and students at Touro University California College of Osteopathic Medicine, Vallejo, CA, September 6, 2018.
Dickerman JL. NBOME Update. Presented to the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine’s Educational Council on Osteopathic Principles Meeting, Biddeford, ME, September 20, 2018.
Finley JM and Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to faculty and students at Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, September 20, 2018.
Finley JM. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to faculty and students at Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, Lebanon, OR, October 10, 2018.
Finley JM. NBOME Fall Visitation 2018. Presented to guests attending the Fall Visitation Day in the Chicago Corporate Offices and Conference Center, Chicago, IL, October 22, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update and Item Writing Workshop. Presented to faculty and students at Liberty University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Lynchburg, VA, October 31, 2018.
Parshall C, Horber D, Julian E. Improve Your Candidate Experience with Action Design. Presented at the 2018 Institute for Credentialing Excellence (ICE) Exchange, Austin, TX, November 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to faculty and students at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine at Arkansas State University, November 1, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update and Item Writing Workshop. Presented to faculty and students at Arkansas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Smith, AR, November 2, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update and Item Writing Workshop. Presented to faculty and students at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Georgia Campus, Suwanee, GA, November 8, 2018.
Dickerman JL and Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update and Item Writing Workshop. Presented to faculty and students at Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Des Moines, IA, November 12, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update and Item Writing Workshop. Presented to faculty and students at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, Glendale, AZ, November 13, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to faculty and students at the A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, Mesa, AZ, November 14, 2018.
Gimpel JR. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Board of Deans Retreat, Phoenix, AZ, November 15, 2018.
Finley JM. NBOME & COMLEX-USA Update. Presented to the Organization of Program Director Association during the Council of Medical Specialty Society’s Biannual Meeting, Arlington, VA, November 16, 2018.

 

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